HIATUS → 17.04 DUE TO EASTER HOLIDAYS

And no one sings me lullabies.

And no one makes me close my eyes.

So I throw the windows wide.

And call to you across the sky.

-- Pink Floyd

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"She had not known before that she wanted all these things, that she preferred dark hair and a slightly cruel expression, that she wished for tallness, or that a man kneeling might thrill her. A whole young life’s worth of slowly collected predilections coalesced in a few moments within her, and Koschei Bessmertny, his lashes full of snow, became perfect."

Deathless | Catherynne M. Valente

fanboyin:

Stephen King being Stephen King

oberynmartall:

[enrolls in oberyn martell’s academy of throwing shade]

"What is Litost? Litost is an untranslatable Czech word. Its first syllable, which is long and stressed, sounds like the wail of an abandoned dog. As for the meaning of this word, I have looked in vain in other languages for an equivalent, though I find it difficult to imagine how anyone can understand the human soul without it. Take an instance from the student’s childhood. His parents made him take violin lessons. He was not very gifted and his teacher would interrupt him to criticize his mistakes in an old, unbearable voice. He felt humiliated, and he wanted to cry. But instead of trying to play in tune and not make mistakes, he would deliberately play wrong notes, the teacher’s voice would become still more unbearable and harsh, and he himself would sink deeper and deeper into his litost. What then is litost? Litost is a state of torment created by the sudden sight of one’s own misery. Anyone with wide experience of the common imperfection of mankind is relatively sheltered from the shocks of litost. For him, the sight of his own misery is ordinary and uninteresting. Litost, therefore, is characteristic of the age of inexperience. It is one of the ornaments of youth."

Milan Kundera,  The Book of Laugher and Forgetting (via sunrec)

“We have both been here before.”

“We found an old hotel in downtown L.A. and went inside to shoot in the lobby, but the guy behind the desk wouldn’t let us take photos,” says Henry Diltz. “So we walked outside to shoot in front when I noticed the guy had left the desk and went into the elevator. I told the band to run inside and pose inside the window. I shot one roll of film and we were gone five minutes later.”

by Amy Higgins

"In these grotesque works, we find that the writer has made alive some experience which we are not accustomed to observe every day, or which the ordinary man may never experience in his ordinary life. We find that connections which we would expect in the customary kind of realism have been ignored, that there are strange skips and gaps which anyone trying to describe manners and customs would certainly not have left. Yet the characters have an inner coherence, if not always a coherence to their social framework. Their fictional qualities lean away from typical social patterns, toward mystery and the unexpected. It is this kind of realism that I want to consider.
[…]
…if the writer believes that our life is and will remain essentially mysterious, if he looks upon us as beings existing in a created order to whose laws we freely respond, then what he sees on the surface will be of interest to him only as he can go through it into an experience of mystery itself. His kind of fiction will always be pushing its own limits outward toward the limits of mystery, because for this kind of writer, the meaning of a story does not begin except at a depth where adequate motivation and adequate psychology and the various determinations have been exhausted. Such a writer will be interested in what we don’t understand rather than in what we do. He will be interested in possibility rather than in probability. He will be interested in characters who are forced out to meet evil and grace and who act on a trust beyond themselves–whether they know very clearly what it is they act upon or not. To the modern mind, this kind of character, and his creator, are typical Don Quixotes, tilting at what is not there.
[…]
I think it is safe to say that while the South is hardly Christ-centered, it is most certainly Christ-haunted. The Southerner, who isn’t convinced of it, is very much afraid that he may have been formed in the image and likeness of God. Ghosts can be very fierce and instructive. They cast strange shadows, particularly in our literature. In any case, it is when the freak can be sensed as a figure for our essential displacement that he attains some depth in literature.
[…]
The problem for such a novelist will be to know how far he can distort without destroying, and in order not to destroy, he will have to descend far enough into himself to reach those underground springs that give life to big work. This descent into himself will, at the same time, be a descent into his region. It will be a descent through the darkness of the familiar into a world where, like the blind man cured in the gospels, he sees men its if they were trees, but walking. This is the beginning of vision, and I feel it is a vision which we in the South must at least try to understand if we want to participate in the continuance of a vital Southern literature."

Flannery O’Conner, Some Aspects of the Grotesque in Southern Fiction (via borgevino)

Thank you, Calcifer.

vermontparnasse:

rachel likes art: part 17

Sandro Botticelli
c. 1445 - 1510.  Italian

#art

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, by Newt Scamander

facina-oris:

A toast. To the proud Lannister children. 

I FINALLY GOT THE RESULTS FROM THE EXAM IN MARCH AND I PASSED

fionna-andcake:

gapingfurnace:

napoleon bonaparte

image

more like napoleon BORN2PARTY

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I used this on a powerpoint for school and no one laughed except my friend and I

RF